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I think I may have purchased a hybrid hamster


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#1 Harmony

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 08:56 AM

Well, I was going to the pet store a few days ago to buy a new wheel for Rosie(she is a Syrian)-and I was interested in possibly bringing home a dwarf hamster.
Her coloring caught my eye(btw she was labelled as a Fancy Dwarf Hamster, but scientifically as a Campbell's), and I took her home. I was looking around for info and I found out she matches an Opal Platnimum Campbell's I think? But she has a dorsal stripe, and if I am correct, a Campbell's with that coloring does not have a stripe. She also has some "in between" features, and I looked up hybrids and found a picture of one that nearly matches how she looks. :(
Should I be concerned?

I will post pictures soon, hopefully.

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A couple of the pictures are blurry though. :(

Mod's note: Please do not double post but rather edit your original post if you have something to add or change.

Edited by Christmas_hamster, 16 April 2012 - 09:58 PM.





#2 Genevie

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 09:47 PM

Platinum Campbells can definitely have the dorsal stripe :)

This is a platinum opal right here:
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Though, she could still be a hybrid. The majority of pet store hamsters in the UK have been hybridised, and I'd imagine this is similar for the US. I wouldn't say you should be concerned or disheartened, a hybrid is just as cute and loveable as a pure hamster! :) Just don't breed from her (or any hamster from a pet shop, there's a huge line of issues with that) and keep an extra close eye out for diabetes and other problems.

#3 Ankali

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 11:54 PM

Do you know how old she is? She looks like a mottled blue who has silvered. All black based (blue is black and opal) Campbells will silver, some right away, some late in life. I have a male who started silvering at four weeks old, a female who is just starting to silver at 5 months old, and several who are still solid at over 6 months old.

#4 Harmony

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 01:24 AM

Genevie: Thank you! That looks a lot like her-but she has some darker grey arches/spots near her tummy. :D
She has such a sweet personality and is a very very lovable hamster. I don't plan on breeding hamsters.

Ankali: I unfortunately do not know how old she is, but she seemed to be smaller than the others in the tank. She also has dark grey splotches/arches.


This may sound biased/judgmental but another reason why I asked is because Campbell's are generally biters and she isn't.

#5 TeddieBaby

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 01:43 AM

(S)he is beautiful! Lucky you! Posted Image

#6 Harmony

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 02:38 AM

Thank you! She is a precious girl! :)

#7 Christmas_hamster

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 02:59 AM

This may sound biased/judgmental but another reason why I asked is because Campbell's are generally biters and she isn't.


It doesn't sound biased or judgemental. It just sounds misinformed. ;)

Myth: Dwarf hamsters are evil [monsters]. -or- Dwarfs enjoy nothing more than to bite a human.

Truth: Despite popular belief, dwarf hamsters are not the “devil’s creation”. Hamsters in general have a bad reputation for biting, but dwarf hamsters have it the worst. I cannot even count the times I have read this online, heard it from others or have been lectured by pet store employees about the evil dwarf hamster. Dwarfs have this reputation due to some misunderstandings.

The first thing is, hamsters have really terrible eyesight. However they are not helpless due to this, and have learned how to compensate for their less-than-ideal eyesight. Dwarf hamsters often use their teeth to explore something new in order to figure out what it is. This includes your hand, though keep in mind that nibbles do not usually hurt nor do they draw blood. Also because of their poor eyesight hamsters can easily mistake a finger for an enemy (especially if you wake them up, or pick them up with out warning!) or even as a piece of food. It’s important to always let your hamster know that you are there and to wash your hands before handling your hamster so that your hands do not smell like a tasty treat.

The second thing that must be considered is that dwarf hamsters are often found to be cage territorial. This is usually only seen in hamsters that are kept in small cages, although hamsters can carry this habit even if their cage is upgraded. This just means that the hamster is feeling territorial over their home. Sometimes this can be worked out but for the most part, their space must be respected. When a hamster is cage territorial this does not mean that they will not be willing to be handled outside of their cage. Using a tube or a cup of some sort for the hamster to climb into while in their cage is a great way to respect their space yet still get them out.



#8 Harmony

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 03:13 AM

I'm sorry if I sound misinformed, but I've had a couple of dwarf hamsters that would bite down on your finger and would not let go.
Most of the reason why they are biters is a lack of patience from the owner/not being willing to even try to tame them.
(I had patience and tried to tame them but it didn't work well, but you should ALWAYS try)
However, a hamster biting you is no reason to get rid of it in my opinion. You should take proper care of them regardless of how much they do or don't bite.
And pet store employees especially make it sound like they're evil things that no one should own(unless you want to buy all 10 they have shoved in a tiny fish tank....), which isn't true.
The faster they are out of that awful enviroment the better.

#9 Christmas_hamster

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 03:24 AM

I didn't mean to insult you. I just get tired of hearing dwarfs get labelled in such a way when most of the time they don't deserve it. I had one dwarf in particular that was a well accomplished bitter. And he did not let go until he thought you had learned your lesson. Then I upgraded him out of his 10 gallon tank into a 20 gallon long and voila. Within in an hour I was able to handle him without so much as a nibble when I hadn't been able to for months on end. Turns out he had cage aggression issues. Had I tried handling outside of his cage, chances are results would have been different.

#10 Harmony

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 03:30 AM

I try to be more careful with handling them if they are close to a nesting spot because it is essentially like prodding at a dog in his kennel.

Usually they are significantly less aggressive outside of their cage.
I have been considering upgrading to a bin cage, since they are lighter than a fish tank.
(I broke the tank I had by cleaning it x_x)

#11 Christmas_hamster

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 04:01 AM

Usually they are significantly less aggressive outside of their cage.
I have been considering upgrading to a bin cage, since they are lighter than a fish tank.
(I broke the tank I had by cleaning it x_x)

Often times a large cage helps too. I hear you on tanks though. I'm terrified that mine will break, that's why I alway just wiped them down with water and vinegar. :P

#12 Harmony

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 07:44 AM

If I may ask, do you use a scoop to remove the bedding?

#13 Ankali

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 10:28 AM

If she has splotches of blue on her belly, I would definitely say she is a silvering mottled blue :) Silvering only effects the top of the back (hence the dark arches) and little bit of the face.

#14 Christmas_hamster

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 07:59 PM

If I may ask, do you use a scoop to remove the bedding?


Nope I just use my hands. To get what ever is left over I would either vacuum it up or use a dust pan (meant for a broom). I used to use a scoop but it's not as fast and hamster poops don't phase me anymore, lol. I just wash up after. ;)