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Worried about robo dwarf


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#1 one_l_michele

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 08:34 PM

Hi. My daughter has a robo dwarf, Chubs. Well, Chubs was in his exercise ball Sunday and accidentally fell off the counter onto the floor. He had some bleeding from his nose. He seemed ok at first, then seemed to be taking a turn for the worse, he was shaking and seemed to be breathing weird. Both of my daughters were inconsolable. We dug his grave and all that. Then he seemed to be getting better: running in his wheel, eating, etc. He made it through the night and all day yesterday. Being the freak I am, I made an appt with our vet to get Chubs checked out. The vet said he had chipped his front tooth, but that there were no broken bones. He said he had a little bloody discharge there at the vet's office. His nose is a bit swollen, too. He said that we needed to watch him to make sure he was eating because of his tooth. And he is eating.

My question is he still shakes/twitches a bit. Not all the time, but sometimes, but pretty much only when he's sitting. He can walk fine. He's eating and playing in his wheel. He's not lethargic. The vet said that it's most likely from the shock of falling. He did say if it didn't get better, or got worse to bring Chubs back. I guess I'm just worried that something may be wrong with him that the vet missed. This is the sweetest hamster you'll ever meet, and the thought of something happening to him makes me as sad as it my daughter, I think.

Oh, and he wasn't just put on the counter and left there, ignored! My daughter was trying to help my other daughter with her hamster, and absentmindedly put him on the counter. She feels so guilty.

Sorry for this long post. Any help would be greatly appreciated!




#2 missPixy

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 09:36 PM

i don't think it's freakish at all to make a vet appt if chubs was bleeding from
the fall. the bleeding from the nose is what catches my attention. i can understand
bleeding from the mouth since he chipped his tooth. by the way, how "chipped" is
the tooth? hamster teeth are notorious for going out of alignment once one of
them isn't the right length anymore to "meet" the opposing incisor. you need to
keep a close eye on the chipped tooth to see that this doesn't happen. otherwise
you need to get tooth trimmed down.

if his nose is swollen, my question is: the nose is swollen because chubs fell face-first?
or is the nose swollen because cartilage was damaged in the fall? this could be very
painful, and might cause chubs to shake/twitch. we need to get past the symptom
to the cause.

also, what did the vet mean by "a little bloody discharge"? from where? his nose?
someplace else?

hamsters are very sensitive to anything that inhibits their ability to breathe through
their nose, so chubs might also have discomfort because of the nose swelling. and
that's probably why he was breathing weird on sunday~~ hamsters can literally
go into shock when they can't breathe through their nose. the same thing happens
when they get a respiratory problem: they go into shock when they can't breathe
from their nose, and actually die from the drop in body temperature, not the
respiratory problem itself.

is your vet experienced with rodents and hamsters? i'd want to find out if chubs
has any cartilage damage that's causing his twitching/shaking. is his nose still
swollen? we might want to get him some "metacam" which is an anti-inflammatory
medication for dogs, but safe for hamsters. the only difference is that the
metacam must be diluted-down by a vet who understands how to do this for
hamsters; hamsters can't take this medication "straight."

#3 one_l_michele

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 01:04 AM

Thanks so much for taking the time to answer me.

The bloody nose is what bothered me, too. I'm a nurse, so I know that blood from the nose, ears, etc is not a good thing. At first I thought it might be from internal bleeding. But then when the vet said that his tooth was chipped, too, I figured he may just have landed on his face.

His nose isn't as swollen as it was, but it's a bit swollen. He's having no problem finding his food. I was just watching him about an hour ago and he was sniffing, then burrowing to find his sunflower seeds and ate 3 of them after finding them. I think (or maybe hope) it's from the fall.

My husband took my daughter and Chubs to the vet, so I'm not 100% sure exactly what the vet said, but from what I gathered, there was maybe a drop or two of blood in his nose. Personally, I haven't seen any since Sunday, and I've been checking him all the time.

I know our vets see exotic animals, such as rodents and hamsters. So, I'd hope that they had experience with them. There were no small animal vets within 2 hrs from where we live. He said teeth continually grow, so that shouldn't be a problem, but to make sure we visually see him eating every day, but said if the shaking got worse, or didn't get better, to bring him back in. He also said that he should get better everyday. We're bringing Chubs back in 2 weeks for a re-check of the tooth and to make sure all's well. But if I feel that he's not getting better, I'm definitely going to call the vet back. We've only had him for about a month, but he's the sweetest hamster, and he's really grown on us :)

#4 missPixy

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 04:48 AM

you may or may not know this (i don't know how many hamsters you've
had) but unlike other pets like dogs and cats, hamsters have a very short
window where it's feasible to actually take extraordinary steps to help
them~~ such as surgery, for one example. their metabolisms are so
fast that problems multiply quickly, compromising their overall health
and making survival of anesthesia unlikely.

since you're a nurse, you must be very observant to visual cues. watch
chubs carefully for the next couple of days: eating, drinking, activity
level. even personality. any changes in these will tell you whether or
not you need an earlier appt. back with the vet.