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how to take great digicam pics


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#1 wireless-mouse

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Posted 26 September 2003 - 06:21 AM

Taking Pictures with your Digital Camera!!

I know a lot of people have been asking how some other people take such good pics… I am included in the group of having no idea how to take decent pics :cheeky: So, I have compiled some info from various websites (I did a simple Google search for how to take good digital pics). I am currently trying some of this stuff and I hope it will be helpful to all others trying (and maybe not succeeding) to take decent pics of your hammie!!! ;D :biggrin: :veryhappy: (OH and this is ONLY for digicams!!)

Get sharp images: To avoid blur from camera shake: Stand still, hold the camera steady and firmly with both hands, with your elbows tucked in, another useful tip is to use the camera's viewfinder for framing your shots, and not the LCD monitor because using the LCD monitor requires you to hold the camera far from your body, increasing the odds of blurry pictures

Get down to eye level: Position yourself at your subject's eye level. That will give your photos the feeling of being in the middle of it all.

Simplify: Simple is better, Scan for distracting background elements. Is that bright light behind your subject, or the clutter on the coffee table, distracting? Reframe the shot to eliminate the clutter. Try both horizontal and vertical framing.

Think about flash settings *: the best results with flash, you must stay within the effective range of your camera's flash (3 to 10 feet for many models). Move too close and the flash will overpower the scene, yielding overexposure. Move too far away, and your picture will be underexposed and dark. Indoors, be sure to set your camera's red-eye reduction feature. This is especially important when photographing blue-eyed individuals and pets.

Try fill flash outdoors*: Flash can be just as useful outdoors: to make your photos more vibrant with more 'punch,' separating your subject from the background. Use outdoor flash to obtain nicely lit photos of friends or family against a spectacular sunset. Outdoor flash also freezes subject movement, yielding sharper photos, especially in low light. On sunny days, it will fill in shadowy areas.

*p.s. for the above two tips don’t do this w/ your hammie because it can harm their eyes…

Freezing motion
You can spend weeks experimenting with different shutter speeds, different types of motion, and different subjects. At the end of the experiment, you'll have images with a variety of effects and ideas for even more variations. The most common approach for experimenting with motion is to set a fast shutter speed to freeze motion. This technique creates arresting sports shots for sure, and it is a great way to capture a subject in mid-air or mid-whatever. The trick, of course, is timing—knowing when to press the shutter release. This is no small trick if your camera has shutter lag.

You can spend weeks experimenting with different shutter speeds, different types of motion, and different subjects. At the end of the experiment, you'll have images with a variety of effects and ideas for even more variations. The most common approach for experimenting with motion is to set a fast shutter speed to freeze motion. This technique creates arresting sports shots for sure, and it is a great way to capture a subject in mid-air or mid-whatever. The trick, of course, is timing—knowing when to press the shutter release. This is no small trick if your camera has shutter lag.

Factors to consider
Putting the issue of digital camera shutter lag aside for the moment, there are several factors that affect your ability to freeze motion.
•The speed of the subject. Stated simply, the faster the subject is moving, the faster the shutter speed needed to freeze the action. The shutter speed has to be fast enough for the camera to capture a complete single position of the subject before the subject's position changes.
•The camera-to-subject distance. In a nutshell, the closer you are to the action, the faster the action appears, and the faster the shutter speed needed to freeze the action.
•The focal length of the lens. In general, the longer the focal length, the faster the shutter speed needed to freeze action.
•The angle of the subject relative to the camera. Motion appears faster, and requires a faster shutter speed when a subject is moving across the camera's line of sight. Conversely, motion coming toward the camera appears slower and requires a slower shutter speed.

There are other factors to consider in freezing action: Your reaction time, or how long it takes you to realize that now is the time for the shot and to press the shutter release button, and how fast the camera responds. Provided that your reaction time is speedy and the camera's response and autofocusing times are fast, you'll be able to capture the motion at its peak.

If your camera has shutter lag, or a delay from when you press the shutter to when the camera takes the pictures, you'll need to factor in slightly longer time so that you press the release the shutter even sooner. In addition, I recommend using the camera's burst or continuous shooting mode for action pictures. Brush up on the continuous shot options for your camera before you use them. For most newer digital SLR cameras, you can use autofocus tracking, lock-on systems, and nearest-subject tracking that automatically focus on moving subjects after you select the target autofocus sensor. And with almost imperceptible shutter delays, action shots are relatively easy to capture.

OK! so that was a lot of info and you might not have read thru it all, but i reccomend you go on your own search for how to take GREAT digicam pics (if thats what you are interested in of course) :wave:

~wireless- :mouse:




#2 monkeysmom

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Posted 26 September 2003 - 08:40 AM

Wow, excellent information Wireless :mouse:! Thanks for taking the time to put all this together for the members!

:star: :star: :star: :star: :star: gold stars for u!

:veryhappy: :wave:

#3 jkhalican

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Posted 26 September 2003 - 08:54 AM

Those are great advices!!!

#4 Bunny Lover

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Posted 26 September 2003 - 09:21 AM

Thanks a bunch! I'm a horrible photographer!

#5 wireless-mouse

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Posted 27 September 2003 - 03:05 AM

hey EQ! don't worry i am a horrible photographer too, but like always practice makes perfect!!! :star: oh and thanx a bunch monkeysmom (for the 5 stars and for fixing that thing at the supplies board!!)

#6 mookie_monkey

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Posted 27 September 2003 - 03:43 AM

wow thanks for the great tips

#7 wiffy

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Posted 27 September 2003 - 12:10 PM

thx for compiling the info and share with us! great tips! They will come in handy for me! :wave:

#8 dusty

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Posted 27 September 2003 - 12:20 PM

great advice and thanks! :goodvibes:
i will make it a sticky!

#9 wireless-mouse

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Posted 28 September 2003 - 05:02 AM

oh wow! thanx dusty! and HB, it was no prob compiling the whole thing b/c there is sooooo much info out on the internet!! :biggrin:

#10 jer76

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Posted 29 September 2003 - 10:52 PM

Here's some from experience... keke dun go too near to the hamster coz the camera cannot focus.. dat's y you end up with blurred pics..

For sharp focus hold the shutter button halfway depressed until u hear a beep sound, if you go too near the camera cannot focus.. try use the "flower" icon ( macro mode ) in your cam.

Holding the camera still is one thing but if your hammie's too active you will also end up with blurred pics.. to prevent this you can either use the flash or put the cage in a bright place eg under the light.

Try to get your hamster's attention by dangling food or be patient n wait for your hamster to do something funny..

wireless-mouse has a really good article for photographing your hamsters.. so go practice n try win the hamster pic contest :)

#11 foxxyy

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Posted 30 September 2003 - 04:22 AM

great thanks for the information!!! ;D your a professional!! lol

#12 Bunny Lover

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Posted 03 October 2003 - 07:43 AM

I just printed this out for later use!

#13 crissa

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Posted 25 October 2003 - 09:31 AM

Great advice everyone, it helped us get some good pictures. We also learned a few things that might help others. The advice not to get too close is very important. Stand back a few feet, zoom in a little if your camera can. Use one of the higher resolutions on your digital camera. I use the automatic flash setting which does a flash indoors. Not getting too close also is better for the Hamster who could get temporarilly blinded a flash :scared: I know I do!

After you transfer the photo to your computer use some of the features of the sofware that comes with your camera. Two in particular are important - red eye reduction and cropping. Hamsters eyes can turn bright red in a flash photo becuase blood veins in their eyes reflect back red. Red eye reduction is best done by zooming (with the software) around the face, select red eye reduction from the software (ususally in the menu) and click in the eye area - it changes red to black. This is also good to know if you take pictures of people!

Cropping is simply outlining the best part of the photo and cutting away the rest. You end up with a smaller picture in high resolution! It takes me a few times to do it just right. Be sure to save the cropped image with a different filename so you can go back to the original if you need to.

Resizing is also something to learn. You can save the image to a certain frame size like 640 x 480 which is a good size for web photos. Experiment to find the size that works for you. Finally save the file, jpg format is fine. When saving jpg files you can sometimes do a final adjustment using percent quality. A 50% or 75% quality setting gives a great quality on the web and reduces the size of the file.

You can see the quality and size of your final photo if you open it in your browser. For Internet Explorer in the upper left of the browser click on File, then Open, then Browse to find the photo file. Other browers have similar capabilities.

I know this is a lot of information but digital cameras are getting popular (even in some cell phones!!!) and I thought a few HH fans could be helped by my years of trial and error.

crissa's dad :coffee:

P.S. One inexpensive software for this type of photo is at http://www.photodex.com/ it is CompuPic (currently version 6.2). They have a trial usage period to see if it works for you. There are many others fine inexpensive programs for this.

#14 dusty

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Posted 25 October 2003 - 09:18 PM

hey, great advice crissa's dad!
nice and simple for everyone to understand...

thanks so much!
:veryhappy:

#15 HamBagel

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Posted 02 November 2003 - 10:22 AM

Wow! Thanks for the great tips! Thankies much for taking your time to put those together!